Birds of Passage review

Grant Hess, MVC staff writer

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“Birds of Passage” is an indie film featuring a diverse cast of colorful characters. The film centers around the Wayuu community in central Mexico, and their adventure into the drug market. The film is definitely a foreign film, with no English at all. All dialogue is in Spanish instead. While this was a minor inconvenience, it was not a hindrance to the enjoyment of the film, since “Birds of Passage” is a visual medium.

The film featured several instances of contrast, with one major one being when the main character gets a nice new house. This is shown in contrast with his native land, which is incredibly barren. The antagonist of this film is also shown in this context, as he has bleach blonde hair, while most of the people looking like they belong in this group of natives. The antagonist, unlike the rest of the Wayuus, has blonde hair and is the epitome of modernism and degeneracy.

Nathan Conway, 12, said, “Maybe if it was in English I would have like it more, or at least sympathized with the main characters more than I did.”

Overall, I would give it 4 out of 5 stars for its art style and message of sticking to your roots and trusting your elders, a memorable film to be sure.

“Birds of Passage” is an indie film featuring a diverse cast of colorful characters. The film centers around the Wayuu community in central Mexico, and their adventure into the drug market. The film is definitely a foreign film, with no English at all. All dialogue is in Spanish instead. While this was a minor inconvenience, it was not a hindrance to the enjoyment of the film, since “Birds of Passage” is a visual medium.

The film featured several instances of contrast, with one major one being when the main character gets a nice new house. This is shown in contrast with his native land, which is incredibly barren. The antagonist of this film is also shown in this context, as he has bleach blonde hair, while most of the people looking like they belong in this group of natives. The antagonist, unlike the rest of the Wayuus, has blonde hair and is the epitome of modernism and degeneracy.

Nathan Conway, 12, said, “Maybe if it was in English I would have like it more, or at least sympathized with the main characters more than I did.”

Overall, I would give it 4 out of 5 stars for its art style and message of sticking to your roots and trusting your elders, a memorable film to be sure.

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